≠Art of Fresh≠

Aubrey O’Day: Cocaine and Pussy

Posted in News by Dy Allo on March 22, 2009
[Russell Simmons recently advised former Danity Kane member,Aubrey O'Day, 
that she needed to be be less controversial if she desired credibility and 
longevity in the music industry. She posted this rebuttal on Simmons' website,
Global Grind, calling him out for his hypocrisy. She goes in on this, and
 might i add, in a very eloquent manner.]
aubrey-o-day000x0321x447
What did the king of all things say he wanted when he started his career?  
Simple.  "Cocaine and p*ssy".  

Now you can't imagine that goal leading to much more than a two hit wonder
 rapper that made his highest radio play off of his smash "Booty juice" 
(shout out to Fear of a Black Hat) but by some miraculous twist of fate and 
hard work that goal gave birth to a mogul that continues to inspire millions;
 a man living, breathing, and continually defining hip hop.             

I use that intro to bring this idea to the table: Aren't we all taking 
 ourselves a lil' too seriously? In the entertainment industry there is this 
strong pressure to be an artist that has "longevity and credibility". Don't 
get me wrong; those are amazing goals but all too often, we measure every 
action of an artist as to whether it will directly achieve those goals.  
Webster’s dictionary defines longevity as "a long continuance". Credibility 
is defined as "the quality of inspiring belief".  Those definitions are 
subjective and therefore capable of holding different meanings depending on
 who you ask. Who on earth is so all knowing and and all powerful that they 
should be the one to define the goal or meaning for another's life and 
career?  

What I've experienced on the music end is a constant pressure to "ACT right
 and SPEAK right". The industry people telling me this are not trying to
 instill better behavior in order to help make me a better person or allow
me to learn some valuable life lesson.  They're telling me, in their words, 
to be "as vague and opinionless as possible, so you don't offend the masses, 
so you will sell a higher number of records".  The industry provides endless
 hours of media training. Yes, they actually hire people to give you the 
"right" answer. How inspiring is that? I'm sure there are exceptions and 
industry leaders that rebel against this format and for those of you 
involved with them... more power to you! I can only speak from my experience,
 and I'm sure this applies far beyond the depths of the music industry, 
as most jobs are usually selling something! 
I know artists that are credible, helpful and "down for any cause", that have 
been denied the ability to do  charity work or to provide aid to a charity,
 based on the fact that something about them did not fit the charity's 
standards of an artist who has "credibility and longevity". How ridiculous 
is that?  We can't even help people any more unless we are living a common 
denominator life! Do our artists really have to be just like us, act like us,
 go to the same church, share our political views, or be role models to our 
children before we buy their music?      

So what I love about the mogul's less than politically correct or "wrong"
 answer, is maybe we all ought to lighten up and allow our artists to be what
 they are and say what they really feel or think instead of giving the 
"vague and opinionless" answer as taught to my generation of artists in 
order to achieve 'credibility and longevity' to sell more records...
 Maybe next time the answer should be something as simple 
as "cocaine and p*ssy".
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